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Genomic signatures of domestication on neurogenetic genes in Drosophila melanogaster

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
26 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Genomic signatures of domestication on neurogenetic genes in Drosophila melanogaster
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0580-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Craig E. Stanley, Rob J. Kulathinal

Abstract

Domesticated animals quickly evolve docile and submissive behaviors after isolation from their wild conspecifics. Model organisms reared for prolonged periods in the laboratory also exhibit similar shifts towards these domesticated behaviors. Yet whether this divergence is due to inadvertent selection in the lab or the fixation of deleterious mutations remains unknown. Here, we compare the genomes of lab-reared and wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster to understand the genetic basis of these recently endowed behaviors common to laboratory models. From reassembled genomes of common lab strains, we identify unique, derived variants not present in global populations (lab-specific SNPs). Decreased selective constraints across low frequency SNPs (unique to one or two lab strains) are different from patterns found in the wild and more similar to neutral expectations, suggesting an overall accumulation of deleterious mutations. However, high-frequency lab SNPs found in most or all lab strains reveal an enrichment of X-linked loci and neuro-sensory genes across large extended haplotypes. Among shared polymorphisms, we also find highly differentiated SNPs, in which the derived allele is higher in frequency in the wild (Fst*wild>lab), enriched for similar neurogenetic ontologies, indicative of relaxed selection on more active wild alleles in the lab. Among random mutations that continuously accumulate in the laboratory, we detect common adaptive signatures in domesticated lab strains of fruit flies. Our results demonstrate that lab animals can quickly evolve domesticated behaviors via unconscious selection by humans early on a broad pool of disproportionately large neurogenetic targets followed by the fixation of accumulated deleterious mutations on functionally similar targets.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 33%
Student > Master 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 19%
Researcher 5 12%
Professor 2 5%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 19%
Computer Science 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2021.
All research outputs
#809,975
of 21,769,404 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#145
of 2,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,291
of 405,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#20
of 249 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,769,404 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,901 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 405,302 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 249 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.