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Long-term influence of recurrent acute otitis media on neural involuntary attention switching in 2-year-old children.

Overview of attention for article published in Behavioral and Brain Functions, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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4 CiteULike
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Title
Long-term influence of recurrent acute otitis media on neural involuntary attention switching in 2-year-old children.
Published in
Behavioral and Brain Functions, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12993-015-0086-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sini Haapala, Elina Niemitalo-Haapola, Antti Raappana, Tiia Kujala, Kalervo Suominen, Eira Jansson-Verkasalo, Teija Kujala

Abstract

A large group of young children are exposed to repetitive middle ear infections but the effects of the fluctuating hearing sensations on immature central auditory system are not fully understood. The present study investigated the consequences of early childhood recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) on involuntary auditory attention switching. By utilizing auditory event-related potentials, neural mechanisms of involuntary attention were studied in 22-26 month-old children (N = 18) who had had an early childhood RAOM and healthy controls (N = 19). The earlier and later phase of the P3a (eP3a and lP3a) and the late negativity (LN) were measured for embedded novel sounds in the passive multi-feature paradigm with repeating standard and deviant syllable stimuli. The children with RAOM had tympanostomy tubes inserted and all the children in both study groups had to have clinically healthy ears at the time of the measurement assessed by an otolaryngologist. The results showed that lP3a amplitude diminished less from frontal to central and parietal areas in the children with RAOM than the controls. This might reflect an immature control of involuntary attention switch. Furthermore, the LN latency was longer in children with RAOM than in the controls, which suggests delayed reorientation of attention in RAOM. The lP3a and LN responses are affected in toddlers who have had a RAOM even when their ears are healthy. This suggests detrimental long-term effects of RAOM on the neural mechanisms of involuntary attention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 27%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 9 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Linguistics 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 12 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2016.
All research outputs
#9,012,720
of 16,752,553 outputs
Outputs from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#161
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,956
of 372,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavioral and Brain Functions
#11
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,752,553 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,245 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.