↓ Skip to main content

Mitochondrial oxidative stress drives tumor progression and metastasis: should we use antioxidants as a key component of cancer treatment and prevention?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
107 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Mitochondrial oxidative stress drives tumor progression and metastasis: should we use antioxidants as a key component of cancer treatment and prevention?
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2011
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-9-62
Pubmed ID
Authors

Federica Sotgia, Ubaldo E Martinez-Outschoorn, Michael P Lisanti

Abstract

The functional role of oxidative stress in cancer pathogenesis has long been a hotly debated topic. A study published this month in BMC Cancer by Goh et al., directly addresses this issue by using a molecular genetic approach, via an established mouse animal model of human breast cancer. More specifically, alleviation of mitochondrial oxidative stress, via transgenic over-expression of catalase (an anti-oxidant enzyme) targeted to mitochondria, was sufficient to lower tumor grade (from high-to-low) and to dramatically reduce metastatic tumor burden by >12-fold. Here, we discuss these new findings and place them in the context of several other recent studies showing that oxidative stress directly contributes to tumor progression and metastasis. These results have important clinical and translational significance, as most current chemo-therapeutic agents and radiation therapy increase oxidative stress, and, therefore, could help drive tumor recurrence and metastasis. Similarly, chemo- and radiation-therapy both increase the risk for developing a secondary malignancy, such as leukemia and/or lymphoma. To effectively reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress, medical oncologists should now re-consider the use of powerful anti-oxidants as a key component of patient therapy and cancer prevention. Please see related research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/11/191.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 3%
Australia 2 2%
South Africa 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 100 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Master 12 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 9%
Other 32 29%
Unknown 6 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 10%
Chemistry 5 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 13 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2019.
All research outputs
#8,918,259
of 15,549,197 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#2,069
of 2,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,403
of 216,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#97
of 119 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,549,197 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,423 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.9. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,077 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 119 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.