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Effects of a 1 year development programme for recently graduated veterinary professionals on personal and job resources: a combined quantitative and qualitative approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of a 1 year development programme for recently graduated veterinary professionals on personal and job resources: a combined quantitative and qualitative approach
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0627-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. J. J. M. Mastenbroek, P. van Beukelen, E. Demerouti, A. J. J. A. Scherpbier, A. D. C. Jaarsma

Abstract

The early years in professional practice are for many veterinary and medical professionals a period of great challenges and consequently increased stress levels. Personal resources appear to have a positive impact on the course of this transition period. Personal resources are defined as developable systems of positive beliefs about one's self and the world that are generally linked to resilience. They are negatively related to burnout and positively and reciprocally to job resources, work engagement and job performance. With the aim of enhancing personal resources of recently graduated veterinarians, a 1 year multi-modular resources development programme was designed. This study was conducted to analyse: 1. if and how the development programme affected participants' personal resources, and 2. if and how personal resources affected participants' work characteristics and work engagement. ᅟ Quantitative study: Twenty-five participants and ten non-participants completed an online survey covering personal resources, job resources and work engagement at the start and finish of the programme. Results showed a significant increase of personal resources in participants for self-reported ratings of proactive behaviour (Effect Size =-0.4), self-efficacy (Effect Size =-0.6) and reflective behaviour (Effect Size =-0.6). Results of the control group were not significant, although some moderate effect sizes were found. Qualitative study: Additionally 16 semi-structured interviews with participants of the programme were taken 6 months after finishing the programme. Analysis of the interviews revealed that participants also developed other important personal resources namely self-acceptance, self-esteem, awareness of own influence and responsibility. The reflection process, which took place in the course of the programme, seemed to be a necessary step for the development of the other personal resources. According to participants of the resources development programme, the increase in personal resources also gave rise to an increase in job resources. The multi-modular resources development programme seems to support development of participants' personal resources. Because personal resources are beneficial in improving well-being irrespective of where an individual starts working, it is important to give them explicit attention in educational settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Professor 6 6%
Researcher 5 5%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 23 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 18 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 6%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 26 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2016.
All research outputs
#13,219,151
of 22,837,982 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#873
of 3,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,376
of 393,178 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#16
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,837,982 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,050 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,178 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.