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Overcoming substrate limitations for improved production of ethylene in E. coli

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Overcoming substrate limitations for improved production of ethylene in E. coli
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13068-015-0413-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean Lynch, Carrie Eckert, Jianping Yu, Ryan Gill, Pin-Ching Maness

Abstract

Ethylene is an important industrial compound for the production of a wide variety of plastics and chemicals. At present, ethylene production involves steam cracking of a fossil-based feedstock, representing the highest CO2-emitting process in the chemical industry. Biological ethylene production can be achieved via expression of a single protein, the ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE), found in some bacteria and fungi; it has the potential to provide a sustainable alternative to steam cracking, provided that significant increases in productivity can be achieved. A key barrier is determining factors that influence the availability of substrates for the EFE reaction in potential microbial hosts. In the presence of O2, EFE catalyzes ethylene formation from the substrates α-ketoglutarate (AKG) and arginine. The concentrations of AKG, a key TCA cycle intermediate, and arginine are tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory system that coordinates carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore, reliably predicting which genetic changes will ultimately lead to increased AKG and arginine availability is challenging. We systematically explored the effects of media composition (rich versus defined), gene copy number, and the addition of exogenous substrates and other metabolites on the formation of ethylene in Escherichia coli expressing EFE. Guided by these results, we tested a number of genetic modifications predicted to improve substrate supply and ethylene production, including knockout of competing pathways and overexpression of key enzymes. Several such modifications led to higher AKG levels and higher ethylene productivity, with the best performing strain more than doubling ethylene productivity (from 81 ± 3 to 188 ± 13 nmol/OD600/mL). Both EFE activity and substrate supply can be limiting factors in ethylene production. Targeted modifications in central carbon metabolism, such as overexpression of isocitrate dehydrogenase, and deletion of glutamate synthase or the transcription regulator ArgR, can effectively enhance substrate supply and ethylene productivity. These results not only provide insight into the intricate regulatory network of the TCA cycle, but also guide future pathway and genome-scale engineering efforts to further boost ethylene productivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 58 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 32%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 4 7%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 29%
Chemistry 4 7%
Chemical Engineering 3 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,686,297
of 6,918,109 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#192
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,121
of 302,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#22
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,918,109 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,338 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.