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Anonymisation of geographical distance matrices via Lipschitz embedding

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Anonymisation of geographical distance matrices via Lipschitz embedding
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12942-015-0031-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Kroll, Rainer Schnell

Abstract

Anonymisation of spatially referenced data has received increasing attention in recent years. Whereas the research focus has been on the anonymisation of point locations, the disclosure risk arising from the publishing of inter-point distances and corresponding anonymisation methods have not been studied systematically. We propose a new anonymisation method for the release of geographical distances between records of a microdata file-for example patients in a medical database. We discuss a data release scheme in which microdata without coordinates and an additional distance matrix between the corresponding rows of the microdata set are released. In contrast to most other approaches this method preserves small distances better than larger distances. The distances are modified by a variant of Lipschitz embedding. The effects of the embedding parameters on the risk of data disclosure are evaluated by linkage experiments using simulated data. The results indicate small disclosure risks for appropriate embedding parameters. The proposed method is useful if published distance information might be misused for the re-identification of records. The method can be used for publishing scientific-use-files and as an additional tool for record-linkage studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 30%
Student > Master 5 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Computer Science 4 20%
Engineering 2 10%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2016.
All research outputs
#11,417,890
of 19,368,131 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#372
of 611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,973
of 388,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#17
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,368,131 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,626 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.