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The art of being mentally healthy: a study to quantify the relationship between recreational arts engagement and mental well-being in the general population

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 11,834)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
344 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
32 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
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Title
The art of being mentally healthy: a study to quantify the relationship between recreational arts engagement and mental well-being in the general population
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2672-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina Davies, Matthew Knuiman, Michael Rosenberg

Abstract

Little is known about the dose-response relationship between recreational arts engagement (for enjoyment, entertainment or as a hobby, rather than therapy) and mental well-being in the general population. The quantification of this relationship is of value to: (1) health professionals, clinicians and researchers interested in utilising the arts as a method for improving mental health; (2) to health promoters and policy makers in the development of population based health messages, policy and practice; and (3) to members of the general public in maintaining or improving their own well-being. As guided by theories of social epidemiology and the biopsychosocial model of health, the first aim of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between arts engagement (hours per year) and mental well-being in the general population. If an association was demonstrated, the second aim was to quantify this relationship. A random sample of 702 Western Australian adults aged 18+ years (response rate = 71 %) were invited to take part in a telephone survey. The survey took 15 min to complete and included questions about arts engagement, mental well-being, demographics and potential confounders/effect modifiers. The dependent variable was subjective mental well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, WEMWBS). The independent variable was hours engaged in the arts in the last 12 months. Respondent engagement in the arts ranged from zero to 1572 hours/year (mean = 100.8 hours/year, SD = 206.0). The prevalence of engagement was 83 %. The average WEMWBS score was 53 (SD = 7.4). After adjustment for demographics (i.e. sex, age group, location, income, education, marital status, children), general health, sports engagement, religious activities and holidays, respondents with high levels of arts engagement (100 or more hours/year, WEMWBS score = 55) had significantly better mental well-being than those with none (0 hours/year, WEMWBS score = 53), low (0.1-22.9 hours/year, WEMWBS score = 52) and medium (23-99.9 hours/year, WEMWBS score = 53) levels of engagement (p = 0.003). Respondents with none, low and medium arts engagement had similar WEMWBS scores (p = 0.358). The relationship between arts engagement and WEMWBS was nonlinear with evidence of a minimum threshold at 100 or more hours/year (p = 0.0006). Evidence of an arts-mental health relationship was found in this study. Those who engaged in 100 or more hours/year of arts engagement (i.e. two or more hours/week) reported significantly better mental well-being than other levels of engagement. The suitability of the arts as a population based strategy to influence the mental well-being of the general population should be investigated further.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 344 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 171 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 16%
Student > Bachelor 24 14%
Researcher 23 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 10%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 28 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 24%
Arts and Humanities 28 16%
Social Sciences 15 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 7%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 40 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 460. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2021.
All research outputs
#31,625
of 17,517,444 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#34
of 11,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#758
of 376,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#2
of 1,127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,517,444 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.