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Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) muscle satellite cells are targets of salmonid alphavirus infection

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) muscle satellite cells are targets of salmonid alphavirus infection
Published in
Veterinary Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13567-015-0301-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Biacchesi, Stéphane, Jouvion, Grégory, Mérour, Emilie, Boukadiri, Abdelhak, Desdouits, Marion, Ozden, Simona, Huerre, Michel, Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel, Brémont, Michel

Abstract

Sleeping disease in rainbow trout is characterized by an abnormal swimming behaviour of the fish which stay on their side at the bottom of the tanks. This sign is due to extensive necrosis and atrophy of red skeletal muscle induced by the sleeping disease virus (SDV), also called salmonid alphavirus 2. Infections of humans with arthritogenic alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are global causes of debilitating musculoskeletal diseases. The mechanisms by which the virus causes these pathologies are poorly understood due to the restrictive availability of animal models capable of reproducing the full spectrum of the disease. Nevertheless, it has been shown that CHIKV exhibits a particular tropism for muscle stem cells also known as satellite cells. Thus, SDV and its host constitute a relevant model to study in details the virus-induced muscle atrophy, the pathophysiological consequences of the infection of a particular cell-type in the skeletal muscle, and the regeneration of the muscle tissue in survivors together with the possible virus persistence. To study a putative SDV tropism for that particular cell type, we established an in vivo and ex vivo rainbow trout model of SDV-induced atrophy of the skeletal muscle. This experimental model allows reproducing the full panel of clinical signs observed during a natural infection since the transmission of the virus is arthropod-borne independent. The virus tropism in the muscle tissue was studied by immunohistochemistry together with the kinetics of the muscle atrophy, and the muscle regeneration post-infection was observed. In parallel, an ex vivo model of SDV infection of rainbow trout satellite cells was developed and virus replication and persistence in that particular cell type was followed up to 73 days post-infection. These results constitute the first observation of a specific SDV tropism for the muscle satellite cells.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Professor 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 15 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2016.
All research outputs
#2,735,703
of 6,978,736 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#223
of 536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,105
of 303,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#8
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,978,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 536 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.