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Physicians’ attitudes and knowledge concerning antibiotic prescription and resistance: questionnaire development and reliability

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
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Title
Physicians’ attitudes and knowledge concerning antibiotic prescription and resistance: questionnaire development and reliability
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1332-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

António Teixeira Rodrigues, Mónica Ferreira, Fátima Roque, Amílcar Falcão, Elmano Ramalheira, Adolfo Figueiras, Maria Teresa Herdeiro

Abstract

Understanding physicians' antibiotic-prescribing behaviour is fundamental when it comes to improving antibiotic use and tackling the growing rates of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of the study was to develop and validate -in terms of face validity, content validity and reliability- an instrument designed to assess the attitudes and knowledge underlying physician antibiotic prescribing. The questionnaire development and validation process comprised two different steps, namely: (1) content and face validation, which included a literature review and validation both by physicians and by Portuguese language and clinical psychology experts; and (2) reliability analysis, using the test-retest method, to assess the questionnaire's internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient - ICC). The questionnaire includes 17 items assessing attitudes and knowledge about antibiotic prescribing and resistances and 9 items evaluating the importance of different sources of knowledge. The study was conducted in the catchment area covered by Portugal's Northern Regional Health Administration and used a convenience sample of 61 primary-care and 50 hospital-care physicians. Response rate was 64 % (49 % to retest) for primary-care physicians and 66 % (60 % to retest) for hospital-care physicians. Content validity resulted in 9 changes to professional concepts. Face validity assessment resulted in 19 changes to linguistic and interpretative terms. In the case of the reliability analysis, the ICC values indicated a minimum of fair to good reproducibility (ICC > 0.4), and the Cronbach alpha values were satisfactory (α > 0.70). The questionnaire developed is valid -in terms of face validity, content validity and reliability- for assessing physicians' attitudes to and knowledge of antibiotic prescribing and resistance, in both hospital and primary-care settings, and could be a very useful tool for characterising physicians' antibiotic-prescribing behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 141 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Researcher 12 8%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 11 8%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 30 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 8%
Psychology 9 6%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 36 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2016.
All research outputs
#874,339
of 11,226,592 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#250
of 4,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,664
of 330,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#8
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,226,592 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,201 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.