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The relationship of telomere length to baseline corticosterone levels in nestlings of an altricial passerine bird in natural populations

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, January 2016
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3 tweeters

Citations

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107 Mendeley
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Title
The relationship of telomere length to baseline corticosterone levels in nestlings of an altricial passerine bird in natural populations
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0133-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Verónica Quirici, Claudia Jimena Guerrero, Jesse S. Krause, John C. Wingfield, Rodrigo A. Vásquez

Abstract

Environmental stressors increase the secretion of glucocorticoids that in turn can shorten telomeres via oxidative damage. Modification of telomere length, as a result of adversity faced early in life, can modify an individual's phenotype. Studies in captivity have suggested a relationship between glucocorticoids and telomere length in developing individuals, however less is known about that relationship in natural populations. In order to evaluate the effect of early environmental stressors on telomere length in natural populations, we compared baseline corticosterone (CORT) levels and telomere length in nestlings of the same age. We collected blood samples for hormone assay and telomere determination from two geographically distinct populations of the Thorn-tailed Rayadito (Aphrastura spinicauda) that differed in brood size; nestlings body mass and primary productivity. Within each population we used path analysis to evaluate the relationship between brood size, body mass, baseline CORT and telomere length. Within each distinct population, path coefficients showed a positive relationship between brood size and baseline CORT and a strong and negative correlation between baseline CORT and telomere length. In general, nestlings that presented higher baseline CORT levels tended to present shorter telomeres. When comparing populations it was the low latitude population that presented higher levels of baseline CORT and shorter telomere length. Taken together our results reveal the importance of the condition experienced early in life in affecting telomere length, and the relevance of integrative studies carried out in natural conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Unknown 105 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 17%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 14 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 51%
Environmental Science 10 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 8%
Neuroscience 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 19 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2016.
All research outputs
#10,187,485
of 15,985,155 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#420
of 536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,171
of 372,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#24
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,985,155 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 536 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,647 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.