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Evolution of the vertebrate skeleton: morphology, embryology, and development

Overview of attention for article published in Zoological Letters, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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74 Dimensions

Readers on

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226 Mendeley
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Title
Evolution of the vertebrate skeleton: morphology, embryology, and development
Published in
Zoological Letters, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40851-014-0007-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatsuya Hirasawa, Shigeru Kuratani

Abstract

Two major skeletal systems-the endoskeleton and exoskeleton-are recognized in vertebrate evolution. Here, we propose that these two systems are distinguished primarily by their relative positions, not by differences in embryonic histogenesis or cell lineage of origin. Comparative embryologic analyses have shown that both types of skeleton have changed their mode of histogenesis during evolution. Although exoskeletons were thought to arise exclusively from the neural crest, recent experiments in teleosts have shown that exoskeletons in the trunk are mesodermal in origin. The enameloid and dentine-coated postcranial exoskeleton seen in many vertebrates does not appear to represent an ancestral condition, as previously hypothesized, but rather a derived condition, in which the enameloid and dentine tissues became accreted to bones. Recent data from placoderm fossils are compatible with this scenario. In contrast, the skull contains neural crest-derived bones in its rostral part. Recent developmental studies suggest that the boundary between neural crest- and mesoderm-derived bones may not be consistent throughout evolution. Rather, the relative positions of bony elements may be conserved, and homologies of bony elements have been retained, with opportunistic changes in the mechanisms and cell lineages of development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 226 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 222 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 39 17%
Researcher 34 15%
Student > Master 34 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 15%
Professor 12 5%
Other 41 18%
Unknown 33 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 87 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 21 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 6%
Environmental Science 9 4%
Other 18 8%
Unknown 42 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2021.
All research outputs
#6,925,550
of 21,992,584 outputs
Outputs from Zoological Letters
#98
of 166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,442
of 407,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zoological Letters
#16
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,992,584 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.