↓ Skip to main content

Reorienting adolescent sexual and reproductive health research: reflections from an international conference

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
10 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
184 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Reorienting adolescent sexual and reproductive health research: reflections from an international conference
Published in
Reproductive Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0117-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristien Michielsen, Sara De Meyer, Olena Ivanova, Ragnar Anderson, Peter Decat, Céline Herbiet, Caroline W. Kabiru, Evert Ketting, James Lees, Caroline Moreau, Deborah L. Tolman, Ine Vanwesenbeeck, Bernardo Vega, Elizabeth Verhetsel, Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli

Abstract

On December 4th 2014, the International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH) at Ghent University organized an international conference on adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) and well-being. This viewpoint highlights two key messages of the conference - 1) ASRH promotion is broadening on different levels and 2) this broadening has important implications for research and interventions - that can guide this research field into the next decade. Adolescent sexuality has long been equated with risk and danger. However, throughout the presentations, it became clear that ASRH and related promotion efforts are broadening on different levels: from risk to well-being, from targeted and individual to comprehensive and structural, from knowledge transfer to innovative tools. However, indicators to measure adolescent sexuality that should accompany this broadening trend, are lacking. While public health related indicators (HIV/STIs, pregnancies) and their behavioral proxies (e.g. condom use, number of partners) are well developed and documented, there is a lack of consensus on indicators for the broader construct of adolescent sexuality, including sexual well-being and aspects of positive sexuality. Furthermore, the debate during the conference clearly indicated that experimental designs may not be the only appropriate study design to measure effectiveness of comprehensive, context-specific and long-term ASRH programmes, and that alternatives need to be identified and applied. Presenters at the conference clearly expressed the need to develop validated tools to measure different sub-constructs of adolescent sexuality and environmental factors. There was a plea to combine (quasi-)experimental effectiveness studies with evaluations of the development and implementation of ASRH promotion initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 184 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 15%
Student > Bachelor 27 15%
Student > Master 21 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 9%
Lecturer 10 5%
Other 37 20%
Unknown 44 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 41 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 21%
Social Sciences 17 9%
Psychology 7 4%
Arts and Humanities 6 3%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 51 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,430,655
of 14,590,652 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#156
of 985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,488
of 365,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#23
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,590,652 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 985 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 365,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.