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Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of cognitive remediation for a national cohort of forensic mental health patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, January 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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170 Mendeley
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Title
Study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of cognitive remediation for a national cohort of forensic mental health patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0707-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken O’Reilly, Gary Donohoe, Danny O’Sullivan, Ciaran Coyle, Ronan Mullaney, Paul O’Connell, Catherine Maddock, Andrea Nulty, Padraic O’Flynn, Carina O’Connell, Harry G Kennedy

Abstract

Evidence is accumulating that cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) is an effective intervention for patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. To date there has been no randomised controlled trial (RCT) cohort study of cognitive remediation within a forensic hospital. The goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a trial of cognitive remediation for forensic mental health patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. An estimated sixty patients will be enrolled in the study. Participants will be randomised to one of two conditions: CRT with treatment as usual (TAU), or TAU. CRT will consist of 42 individual sessions and 14 group sessions. The primary outcome measure for this study is change in cognitive functioning using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB). Secondary outcomes include change in social and occupational functioning, disorganised symptoms, negative symptoms, violence, participation in psychosocial treatment and recovery. In addition to these effectiveness measures, we will examine patient satisfaction. Cognitive difficulties experienced by schizophrenia spectrum patients are associated with general functioning, ability to benefit from psychosocial interventions and quality of life. Research into the treatment of cognitive difficulties within a forensic setting is therefore an important priority. The results of the proposed study will help answer the question whether cognitive remediation improves functional outcomes in forensic mental health patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Forensic mental health patients are detained for the dual purpose of receiving treatment and for public protection. There can be conflict between these two roles perhaps causing forensic services to have an increased length of stay compared to general psychiatric admissions. Ultimately a focus on emphasising cognition and general functioning over symptoms may decrease tension between the core responsibilities of forensic mental health services. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02360813 . Trial registered Feb 4th 2015 and last updated May 1(st) 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 170 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 167 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 18%
Student > Bachelor 26 15%
Researcher 21 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 9%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 30 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 63 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 11%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Neuroscience 4 2%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 43 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2016.
All research outputs
#11,038,496
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,502
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,472
of 367,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#242
of 302 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 302 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.