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Infant mortality and causes of infant deaths in rural Ethiopia: a population-based cohort of 3684 births

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
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Title
Infant mortality and causes of infant deaths in rural Ethiopia: a population-based cohort of 3684 births
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2090-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Berhe Weldearegawi, Yohannes Adama Melaku, Semaw Ferede Abera, Yemane Ashebir, Fisaha Haile, Afework Mulugeta, Frehiwot Eshetu, Mark Spigt

Abstract

Ethiopia has made large-scale healthcare investments to improve child health and survival. However, there is insufficient population level data on the current estimates of infant mortality rate (IMR) in the country. The aim of this study was to measure infant mortality rate, investigate risk factors for infant deaths and identify causes of death in a rural population of northern Ethiopia. Live births to a cohort of mothers under the Kilite Awlaelo Health and Demographic Surveillance System were followed up to their first birthday or death, between September 11, 2009 and September 10, 2013. Maternal and infant characteristics were collected at baseline and during the regular follow-up visit. Multiple-Cox regression was used to investigate risk factors for infant death. Causes of infant death were identified using physician review verbal autopsy method. Of the total 3684 infants followed, 174 of them died before their first birthday, yielding an IMR of 47 per 1000 live births (95 % CI: 41, 54) over the four years of follow-up. About 96 % of infants survived up to their first birthday, and 56 % of infant deaths occurred during the neonatal period. Infants born to mothers aged 15-19 years old had higher risk of death (HR = 2.68, 95 % CI: 1. 74, 4.87) than those born to 25-29 years old. Infants of mothers who attained a secondary school and above had 56 % lower risk of death (HR = 0.44, 95 % CI: 0.24, 0.81) compared to those whose mothers did not attend formal education. Sepsis, prematurity and asphyxia and acute lower respiratory tract infections were the commonest causes of death. The IMR for the four-year period was lower than the national and regional estimates. Our findings suggest the need to improve the newborn care, and empower teenagers to delay teenage pregnancy and attain higher levels of education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Rwanda 2 <1%
Unknown 230 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 19%
Researcher 21 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 9%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Student > Postgraduate 13 6%
Other 40 17%
Unknown 75 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 47 20%
Social Sciences 18 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 3%
Environmental Science 5 2%
Other 21 9%
Unknown 79 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2016.
All research outputs
#4,865,918
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,239
of 11,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,762
of 376,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#484
of 1,127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,738 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.