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Influences on eating: a qualitative study of adolescents in a periurban area in Lima, Peru

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
318 Mendeley
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Title
Influences on eating: a qualitative study of adolescents in a periurban area in Lima, Peru
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2724-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jinan C. Banna, Opal Vanessa Buchthal, Treena Delormier, Hilary M. Creed-Kanashiro, Mary E. Penny

Abstract

Peruvian adolescents are at high nutritional risk, facing issues such as overweight and obesity, anemia, and pregnancy during a period of development. Research seeking to understand contextual factors that influence eating habits to inform the development of public health interventions is lacking in this population. This study aimed to understand socio-cultural influences on eating among adolescents in periurban Lima, Peru using qualitative methods. Semi-structured interviews and pile sort activities were conducted with 14 adolescents 15-17 years. The interview was designed to elicit information on influences on eating habits at four levels: individual (intrapersonal), social environmental (interpersonal), physical environmental (community settings), and macrosystem (societal). The pile sort activity required adolescents to place cards with food images into groups and then to describe the characteristics of the foods placed in each group. Content analysis was used to identify predominant themes of influencing factors in interviews. Multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering analysis was completed with pile sort data. Individual influences on behavior included lack of financial resources to purchase food and concerns about body image. Nutrition-related knowledge also played a role; participants noted the importance of foods such as beans for anemia prevention. At the social environmental level, parents promoted healthy eating by providing advice on food selection and home-cooked meals. The physical environment also influenced intake, with foods available in schools being predominantly low-nutrient energy-dense. Macrosystem influences were evident, as adolescents used the Internet for nutrition information, which they viewed as credible. To address nutrition-related issues such as obesity and iron-deficiency anemia in Peruvian adolescents, further research is warranted to elucidate the roles of certain factors shaping behavior, particularly that of family, cited numerous times as having a positive influence. Addressing nutrition-related issues such as obesity and iron-deficiency anemia in this population requires consideration of the effect of social and environmental factors in the context of adolescent lifestyles on behavior. Nutrition education messages for adolescents should consider the cultural perceptions and importance of particular foods, taking into account the diverse factors that influence eating behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 318 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 317 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 69 22%
Student > Bachelor 46 14%
Researcher 35 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 49 15%
Unknown 67 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 69 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 51 16%
Social Sciences 26 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 8%
Psychology 24 8%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 79 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2016.
All research outputs
#926,630
of 8,739,691 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,191
of 7,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,405
of 326,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#43
of 283 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,739,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 283 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.