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Street characteristics preferred for transportation walking among older adults: a choice-based conjoint analysis with manipulated photographs

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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124 Mendeley
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Title
Street characteristics preferred for transportation walking among older adults: a choice-based conjoint analysis with manipulated photographs
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0331-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jelle Van Cauwenberg, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Peter Clarys, Jack Nasar, Jo Salmon, Liesbet Goubert, Benedicte Deforche, Van Cauwenberg, Jelle, De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse, Clarys, Peter, Nasar, Jack, Salmon, Jo, Goubert, Liesbet, Deforche, Benedicte

Abstract

Knowledge about the relationships between micro-scale environmental factors and older adults' walking for transport is limited and inconsistent. This is probably due to methodological limitations, such as absence of an accurate neighborhood definition, lack of environmental heterogeneity, environmental co-variation, and recall bias. Furthermore, most previous studies are observational in nature. We aimed to address these limitations by investigating the effects of manipulating photographs on micro-scale environmental factors on the appeal of a street for older adults' transportation walking. Secondly, we used latent class analysis to examine whether subgroups could be identified that have different environmental preferences for transportation walking. Thirdly, we investigated whether these subgroups differed in socio-demographic, functional and psychosocial characteristics, current level of walking and environmental perceptions of their own street. Data were collected among 1131 Flemish older adults through an online (n = 940) or an interview version of the questionnaire (n = 191). This questionnaire included a choice-based conjoint exercise with manipulated photographs of a street. These manipulated photographs originated from one panoramic photograph of an existing street that was manipulated on nine environmental attributes. Participants chose which of two presented streets they would prefer to walk for transport. In the total sample, sidewalk evenness had by far the greatest appeal for transportation walking. The other environmental attributes were less important. Four subgroups that differed in their environmental preferences for transportation walking were identified. In the two largest subgroups (representing 86 % of the sample) sidewalk evenness was the most important environmental attribute. In the two smaller subgroups (each comprising 7 % of the sample), traffic volume and speed limit were the most important environmental attributes for one, and the presence of vegetation and a bench were the most important environmental attributes for the other. This latter subgroup included a higher percentage of service flat residents than the other subgroups. Our results suggest that the provision of even sidewalks should be considered a priority when developing environmental interventions aiming to stimulate older adults' transportation walking. Natural experiments are needed to confirm whether our findings can be translated to real environments and actual transportation walking behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 121 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Researcher 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 23 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 18 15%
Psychology 10 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Engineering 7 6%
Other 40 32%
Unknown 32 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2021.
All research outputs
#4,682,808
of 18,954,860 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,239
of 1,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,114
of 356,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#14
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,954,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,742 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.1. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 356,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.