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Low vitamin D and the risk of developing chronic widespread pain: results from the European male ageing study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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35 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Low vitamin D and the risk of developing chronic widespread pain: results from the European male ageing study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0881-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul S. McCabe, Stephen R. Pye, John Mc Beth, David M. Lee, Abdelouahid Tajar, Gyorgy Bartfai, Steven Boonen, Roger Bouillon, Felipe Casanueva, Joseph D. Finn, Gianni Forti, Aleksander Giwercman, Ilpo T. Huhtaniemi, Krzysztof Kula, Neil Pendleton, Margus Punab, Dirk Vanderschueren, Frederick C. Wu, Terence W. O’Neill

Abstract

The association between low levels of vitamin D and the occurrence of chronic widespread pain (CWP) remains unclear. The aim of our analysis was to determine the relationship between low vitamin D levels and the risk of developing CWP in a population sample of middle age and elderly men. Three thousand three hundred sixty nine men aged 40-79 were recruited from 8 European centres for a longitudinal study of male ageing, the European Male Ageing Study. At baseline participants underwent assessment of lifestyle, health factors, physical characteristics and gave a fasting blood sample. The occurrence of pain was assessed at baseline and follow up (a mean of 4.3 years later) by shading painful sites on a body manikin. The presence of CWP was determined using the ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH) D) was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between baseline vitamin D levels and the new occurrence of CWP. Two thousand three hundred thirteen men, mean age 58.8 years (SD = 10.6), had complete pain and vitamin data available and contributed to this analysis. 151 (6.5 %) developed new CWP at follow up and 577 (24.9 %) were pain free at both time points, the comparator group. After adjustment for age and centre, physical performance and number of comorbidities, compared to those in upper quintile of 25-(OH) D ( ≥36.3 ng/mL), those in the lowest quintile (<15.6 ng/mL) were more likely to develop CWP (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.93; 95 % CI = 1.0-3.6). Further adjustment for BMI (OR = 1.67; 95 % CI = 0.93-3.02) or depression (OR = 1.77; 95 % CI = 0.98-3.21), however rendered the association non-significant. Low vitamin D is linked with the new occurrence of CWP, although this may be explained by underlying adverse health factors, particularly obesity and depression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 105 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 21%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 20 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 14%
Psychology 8 7%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 25 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2016.
All research outputs
#920,805
of 16,478,598 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#176
of 3,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,816
of 345,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,478,598 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,436 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them