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Impact of heparanase on renal fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2015
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Impact of heparanase on renal fibrosis
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0538-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valentina Masola, Gianluigi Zaza, Maurizio Onisto, Antonio Lupo, Giovanni Gambaro

Abstract

Tubulo-interstitial fibrosis has been recognized as the hallmark of progression of chronic kidney disease, but, despite intensive research studies, there are currently no biomarkers or effective treatments for this condition. In this context, a promising candidate could be heparanase-1 (HPSE), an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate chains and thus takes part in extracellular matrix remodeling. As largely described, it has a central role in the pathogenesis of cancer and inflammation, and it participates in the complex biological machinery involved in the onset of different renal proteinuric diseases (e.g., diabetic nephropathy, glomerulonephritis). Additionally, HPSE may significantly influence the progression of chronic kidney damage trough its major role in the biological pathway of renal fibrogenesis. Here, we briefly summarize data supporting the role of HPSE in renal damage, focusing on recent evidences that demonstrate the capability of this enzyme to modulate the signaling of pro-fibrotic factors such as FGF-2 and TGF-β and consequently to control the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in renal tubular cells. We also emphasize the need of the research community to undertake studies and clinical trials to assess the potential clinical employment of this enzyme as diagnostic and prognostic tool and/or its role as therapeutic target for new pharmacological interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Professor 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Psychology 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,998,007
of 8,295,152 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,599
of 1,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,941
of 331,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#73
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,295,152 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,827 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,430 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.