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Ethanol induces cytostasis of cortical basal progenitors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
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Title
Ethanol induces cytostasis of cortical basal progenitors
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12929-016-0225-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanjot Kaur Riar, Madhusudhanan Narasimhan, Mary Latha Rathinam, George I. Henderson, Lenin Mahimainathan

Abstract

Developing brain is a major target for alcohol's actions and neurological/functional abnormalities include microencephaly, reduced frontal cortex, mental retardation and attention-deficits. Previous studies have shown that ethanol altered the lateral ventricular neuroepithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of ethanol on subventricular basal progenitors which generate majority of the cortical layers is not known. We utilized spontaneously immortalized rat brain neuroblasts obtained from cultures of 18-day-old fetal rat cerebral cortices using in vitro ethanol exposures and an in utero binge model. In the in vitro acute model, cells were exposed to 86 mM ethanol for 8, 12 and 24 h. The second in vitro model comprised of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure which consisted of 14 h of ethanol treatment followed by 10 h of withdrawal with three repetitions. E18 neuroblasts expressing Tbr2 representing immature basal progenitors displayed significant reduction of proliferation in response to ethanol in both the models. The decreased proliferation was accompanied by absence of apoptosis or autophagy as illustrated by FACS analysis and expression of apoptotic and autophagic markers. The BrdU incorporation assay indicated that ethanol enhanced the accumulation of cells at G1 with reduced cell number in S phase. In addition, the ethanol-inhibited basal neuroblasts proliferation was connected to decrease in cyclin D1 and Rb phosphorylation indicating cell cycle arrest. Further, in utero ethanol exposure in pregnant rats during E15-E18 significantly decreased Tbr2 and cyclin D1 positive cell number in cerebral cortex of embryos as assessed by cell sorting analysis by flow cytometry. Altogether, the current findings demonstrate that ethanol impacts the expansion of basal progenitors by inducing cytostasis that might explain the anomalies of cortico-cerebral development associated with fetal alcohol syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Researcher 2 8%
Lecturer 1 4%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 9 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 9 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2016.
All research outputs
#7,592,947
of 8,756,523 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#308
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#280,579
of 335,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#15
of 18 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.