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Endothelium-derived microparticles from chronically thromboembolic pulmonary hypertensive patients facilitate endothelial angiogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
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Title
Endothelium-derived microparticles from chronically thromboembolic pulmonary hypertensive patients facilitate endothelial angiogenesis
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12929-016-0224-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daria Belik, Hilda Tsang, John Wharton, Luke Howard, Carmelo Bernabeu, Beata Wojciak-Stothard

Abstract

Increased circulating levels of endoglin(+) endothelial microparticles (EMPs) have been identified in several cardiovascular disorders, related to severity. Endoglin is an auxilary receptor for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) important in the regulation of vascular structure. We quantified the number of microparticles in plasma of six patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) and age- and sex-matched pulmonary embolic (PE) and healthy controls and investigated the role of microparticle endoglin in the regulation of pulmonary endothelial function in vitro. Results show significantly increased levels of endoglin(+) EMPs in CTEPH plasma, compared to healthy and disease controls. Co-culture of human pulmonary endothelial cells with CTEPH microparticles increased intracellular levels of endoglin and enhanced TGF-β-induced angiogenesis and Smad1,5,8 phosphorylation in cells, without affecting BMPRII expression. In an in vitro model, we generated endothelium-derived MPs with enforced membrane localization of endoglin. Co-culture of these MPs with endothelial cells increased cellular endoglin content, improved cell survival and stimulated angiogenesis in a manner similar to the effects induced by overexpressed protein. Increased generation of endoglin(+) EMPs in CTEPH is likely to represent a protective mechanism supporting endothelial cell survival and angiogenesis, set to counteract the effects of vascular occlusion and endothelial damage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Lecturer 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 15%
Sports and Recreations 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,012,605
of 7,003,089 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#255
of 326 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#259,309
of 316,070 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#15
of 18 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 326 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.