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Predicting condom use in adolescents: a test of three socio-cognitive models using a structural equation modeling approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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138 Mendeley
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Title
Predicting condom use in adolescents: a test of three socio-cognitive models using a structural equation modeling approach
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2702-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

José P. Espada, Alexandra Morales, Alejandro Guillén-Riquelme, Rafael Ballester, Mireia Orgilés

Abstract

The theory of planned behavior (TPB), socio-cognitive model (SCM), and information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model are effective in predicting condom use. However, the adequacy of these three theoretical models in predicting the frequency of condom use (FCU) among young people has not been compared. This cross-sectional study tested the applicability and suitability of these three models in predicting the FCU, and analyzed the relationships among the postulated constructs. Sexually experienced adolescents (n = 410) aged 13-18 completed a survey assessing the TPB, SCM, and IMB model constructs. Participants were students recruited from 18 high schools, randomly selected from the north, south, east, and southeast of Spain. A structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis was applied to test TPB, SCM and IBM and constructs relationships of each model using R. The results of SEM demonstrated that behavioral skills predict behavior via motivation as hypothesized by the IMB model, but not directly via knowledge about condom use and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Cognitive factors, such knowledge about condom use and STIs as well as condom use self-efficacy, directly predicted the FCU when modeled as per the SCM. According to the TPB, condom use intention was the best predictor of the FCU, and condom use intention was predicted by attitudes toward condom use and subjective norms related to condom use, but perceived control was not directly or indirectly related to the FCU. Based on the data, the TPB becomes the best-fit model for predicting the FCU among young people compared to the SCM and IMB model. From a statistical perspective, the TPB seems to be the most suitable model for predicting the FCU among young people compared to the other models. Overall, key direct predictors of the FCU in adolescents included condom use intention, behavioral skills and cognitive factors, such as STIs knowledge and condom use self-efficacy. The next step should be to test integrative models that include personal, contextual, environmental, and social factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 136 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 9%
Researcher 10 7%
Other 28 20%
Unknown 21 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 27 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 17%
Social Sciences 14 10%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 26 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2017.
All research outputs
#2,753,374
of 11,430,110 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,973
of 7,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,331
of 341,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#85
of 252 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,430,110 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,889 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 252 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.