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Associations between lifestyle behaviours and optimal wellbeing in a diverse sample of New Zealand adults

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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110 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between lifestyle behaviours and optimal wellbeing in a diverse sample of New Zealand adults
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2755-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate B. Prendergast, Grant M. Schofield, Lisa M. Mackay

Abstract

In positive psychology optimal wellbeing is considered a broad, multi-dimensional construct encompassing both feelings and functioning. Yet, this notion of wellbeing has not been translated into public health. The purpose of this study is to integrate public health and positive psychology to determine associations between lifestyle behaviours and optimal wellbeing in a diverse sample of New Zealand adults. A web-based survey design was employed to collect data. Participants reported on their wellbeing and lifestyle behaviours including nutrition, exercise, sedentary behaviour, and sleep. Optimal wellbeing was calculated using a multi-dimensional scale designed to mirror the internationally recognised diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Binary logistic regression was used to calculate associations between 10 lifestyle behaviours and optimal wellbeing. Of the total sample (n = 9514), 24 % met the criteria for optimal wellbeing. Compared to reference groups, the association with optimal wellbeing was greater for those who reported exercising ≥7 times/week (odds ratio: 1.61, 95 % confidence interval: 1.22-2.13, p < 0.01) and sitting "almost none of the time" (1.87, 1.01-3.29, p < 0.01). Optimal wellbeing was lower for those reporting restless sleep "almost all of the time" (0.24, 95 % CI: 0.17-0.32 p < 0.01) and consuming sugary drinks 5-6 times/week (0.73, 95 % CI: 0.53-0.95, p < 0.05). Public health and positive psychology were integrated to provide support for a relationship between lifestyle behaviours and a multi-dimensional measure of optimal wellbeing. It is likely this relationship between lifestyle behaviours and optimal wellbeing is bidirectional giving rise to the debate that holistic approaches are needed to promote positive health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 109 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 22 20%
Student > Master 17 15%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 23 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 23%
Psychology 19 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Sports and Recreations 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 28 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,901,154
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,193
of 11,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,130
of 348,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,738 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,261 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them