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Lymphocyte depletion and repopulation after chemotherapy for primary breast cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 1,863)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
137 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Lymphocyte depletion and repopulation after chemotherapy for primary breast cancer
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-015-0669-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rashmi Verma, Ruth E. Foster, Kieran Horgan, Katherine Mounsey, Helen Nixon, Natuley Smalle, Thomas A. Hughes, Clive RD. Carter

Abstract

Approximately 30 % of breast cancer patients receive chemotherapy, yet little is known about influences of current regimens on circulating lymphocyte levels and phenotypes. Similarly, clinico-pathological factors that modify these influences, and implications for future immune health remain mainly unexplored. We used flow-cytometry to assess circulating lymphocyte levels and phenotypes in 88 primary breast cancer patients before chemotherapy and at time-points from 2 weeks to 9 months after chemotherapy completion. We examined circulating titres of antibodies against pneumococcal and tetanus antigens using ELISAs. Levels of B, T and NK cells were significantly reduced 2 weeks after chemotherapy (p < 0.001). B cells demonstrated particularly dramatic depletion, falling to 5.4 % of pre-chemotherapy levels. Levels of all cells recovered to some extent, although B and CD4(+) T cells remained significantly depleted even 9 months post-chemotherapy (p < 0.001). Phenotypes of repopulating B and CD4(+) T cells were significantly different from, and showed no sign of returning to pre-chemotherapy profiles. Repopulating B cells were highly depleted in memory cells, with proportions of memory cells falling from 38 % to 10 % (p < 0.001). Conversely, repopulating CD4(+) T cells were enriched in memory cells, which increased from 63 % to 75 % (p < 0.001). Differences in chemotherapy regimen and patient smoking were associated with significant differences in depletion extent or repopulation dynamics. Titres of anti-pneumococcal and anti-tetanus antibodies were both significantly reduced post-chemotherapy and did not recover during the study (p < 0.001). Breast cancer chemotherapy is associated with long-term changes in immune parameters that should be considered during clinical management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 156 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 18%
Researcher 24 15%
Student > Master 16 10%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Other 11 7%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 42 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 4%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 53 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2021.
All research outputs
#319,800
of 22,097,252 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#31
of 1,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,424
of 377,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,097,252 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,863 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 377,576 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.