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Gingival fibromatosis: clinical, molecular and therapeutic issues

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, January 2016
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Title
Gingival fibromatosis: clinical, molecular and therapeutic issues
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13023-016-0395-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katarzyna Gawron, Katarzyna Łazarz-Bartyzel, Jan Potempa, Maria Chomyszyn-Gajewska

Abstract

Gingival fibromatosis is a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders that develop as slowly progressive, local or diffuse enlargements within marginal and attached gingiva or interdental papilla. In severe cases, the excess tissue may cover the crowns of the teeth, thus causing functional, esthetic, and periodontal problems, such as bone loss and bleeding, due to the presence of pseudopockets and plaque accumulation. It affects both genders equally. Hereditary, drug-induced, and idiopathic gingival overgrowth have been reported. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pathologic manifestation of gingival fibromatosis comprises excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, of which collagen type I is the most prominent example. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene has been suggested as one possible etiological cause of isolated (non-syndromic) hereditary gingival fibromatosis, but mutations in other genes are also likely to be involved, given the heterogeneity of this condition. The most attractive concept of mechanism for drug-induced gingival overgrowth is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which interactions between gingival cells and the extracellular matrix are weakened as epithelial cells transdifferentiate into fibrogenic fibroblast-like cells. The diagnosis is mainly made on the basis of the patient's history and clinical features, and on histopathological evaluation of affected gingiva. Early diagnosis is important, mostly to exclude oral malignancy. Differential diagnosis comprises all pathologies in the mouth with excessive gingival overgrowth. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis may present as an autosomal-dominant or less commonly autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. If a systemic disease or syndrome is suspected, the patient is directed to a geneticist for additional clinical examination and specialized diagnostic tests. Treatments vary according to the type of overgrowth and the extent of disease progression, thus, scaling of teeth is sufficient in mild cases, while in severe cases surgical intervention is required. Prognosis is precarious and the risk of recurrence exists.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 14 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Linguistics 1 1%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 21 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,036,496
of 7,059,888 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#752
of 1,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,017
of 318,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#28
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,059,888 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,013 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.