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Psychological and personality factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, presenting the rationale and exploratory results from The Maastricht Study, a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, January 2016
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Citations

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Title
Psychological and personality factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, presenting the rationale and exploratory results from The Maastricht Study, a population-based cohort study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0722-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fleur E. P. van Dooren, Johan Denollet, Frans R. J. Verhey, Coen D. A. Stehouwer, Simone J. S. Sep, Ronald M. A. Henry, Stef P. J. Kremers, Pieter C. Dagnelie, Nicolaas C. Schaper, Carla J. H. van der Kallen, Annemarie Koster, Frans Pouwer, Miranda T. Schram

Abstract

Strong longitudinal evidence exists that psychological distress is associated with a high morbidity and mortality risk in type 2 diabetes. Little is known about the biological and behavioral mechanisms that may explain this association. Moreover, the role of personality traits in these associations is still unclear. In this paper, we first describe the design of the psychological part of The Maastricht Study that aims to elucidate these mechanisms. Next, we present exploratory results on the prevalence of depression, anxiety and personality traits in type 2 diabetes. Finally, we briefly discuss the importance of these findings for clinical research and practice. We measured psychological distress and depression using the MINI diagnostic interview, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 questionnaires in the first 864 participants of The Maastricht Study, a large, population-based cohort study. Personality traits were measured by the DS14 and Big Five personality questionnaires. Type 2 diabetes was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of depression, anxiety and personality with type 2 diabetes, adjusted for age, sex and education level. Individuals with type 2 diabetes had higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms, odds ratios (95 % CI) were 3.15 (1.49; 6.67), 1.73 (0.83-3.60), 1.50 (0.72-3.12), for PHQ-9 ≥ 10, current depressive disorder and GAD-7 ≥ 10, respectively. Type D personality, social inhibition and negative affectivity were more prevalent in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios were 1.95 (1.23-3.10), 1.35 (0.93-1.94) and 1.70 (1.14-2.51), respectively. Individuals with type 2 diabetes were less extraverted, less conscientious, less agreeable and less emotionally stable, and similar in openness to individuals without type 2 diabetes, although effect sizes were small. Individuals with type 2 diabetes experience more psychological distress and have different personality traits compared to individuals without type 2 diabetes. Future longitudinal analyses within The Maastricht Study will increase our understanding of biological and behavioral mechanisms that link psychological distress to morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 19%
Student > Master 20 17%
Researcher 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 8 7%
Other 27 23%
Unknown 23 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 31 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2016.
All research outputs
#10,320,281
of 16,170,019 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,542
of 3,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,750
of 345,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,170,019 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,608 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,181 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them