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Hazards inherent in interdisciplinary behavioral research

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, January 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Hazards inherent in interdisciplinary behavioral research
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/1742-9994-12-s1-s21
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Crews, Seth A Weisberg, Sahotra Sarkar

Abstract

Many, if not all, questions in biology and psychology today were formulated and considered in depth, though typically in a different language, from the 1700's to the early 1900's. However, because of politics or fashion, some topics fell out of favor or failed to recruit new scientists and hence languished. Despite greatly expanded scholarship in the history of the life sciences in the twentieth century, many such topics have had to be rediscovered in recent years, while much of the wisdom already accrued stays in the older literature and not in active minds. This is particularly true today when scientific advances appear at breakneck speed. It would not be an exaggeration to say that many 'breakthroughs' turn out really to be rediscoveries of forgotten observations. Two areas of particular significance to the interdisciplinary study of behavior are the Norms of Reaction (from Biology) and the concept of Plasticity (from Psychology). These and related fields benefit from the perspective of epigenetics so long as rigorous operational definitions are implemented. It is also important to revive Hogben's admonition that the interaction of hereditary and environment cannot be understood outside of the context of development. Five examples of increasing complexity in phenotypic plasticity in brain and behavior are presented to illustrate this perspective.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 6%
Germany 1 3%
Switzerland 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 44%
Psychology 4 12%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2021.
All research outputs
#16,551,563
of 21,252,842 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#541
of 637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#250,525
of 373,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,252,842 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 637 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.7. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.