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Paternal early experiences influence infant development through non-social mechanisms in Rhesus Macaques

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, January 2015
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Title
Paternal early experiences influence infant development through non-social mechanisms in Rhesus Macaques
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/1742-9994-12-s1-s14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin L Kinnally, John P Capitanio

Abstract

Early experiences influence the developing organism, with lifelong and potentially adaptive consequences. It has recently become clear that the effects of early experiences are not limited to the exposed generation, but can influence physiological and behavioral traits in the next generation. Mechanisms of transgenerational effects of parental early experiences on offspring development are often attributed to prenatal or postnatal parental influence, but recent data suggest that germ-line plasticity may also play a role in the transgenerational effects of early experiences. These non-genetic transgenerational effects are a potentially important developmental and evolutionary force, but the effects of parental experiences on behavior and physiology are not well understood in socially complex primates. In the non-human primate, the rhesus macaque, nursery rearing (NR) is an early life manipulation used for colony management purposes, and involves separating infants from parents early in life. We examined the effects of maternal and paternal early NR on infant rhesus macaque immunity, physiology, and behavior. We theorized that differences in behavior or physiology in the absence of parent-offspring social contact would point to biological and perhaps germ-line, rather than social, mechanisms of effect. Thus, all subjects were themselves NR. Male and female infant rhesus macaques (N= 206) were separated from parents and social groups in the first four days of life to undergo NR. These infants differed only in their degree of NR ancestry - whether their dams or sires were themselves NR. At 3-4 months of age, infants underwent a standardized biobehavioral assessment. Factors describing immunity, plasma cortisol, and emotion regulation were generated from these data using factor analysis. Paternal, but not maternal, NR was associated with greater emotionality and higher plasma cortisol, compared with infants born to CONTROL reared fathers. These data suggest that macaque biobehavioral makeup is strongly influenced by paternal experiences, and via non-social mechanisms.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 61 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 34%
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 23%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 16 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2016.
All research outputs
#10,500,185
of 13,783,341 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#418
of 500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,691
of 337,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,783,341 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 500 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.