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Socio-economic determinants of household food security and women’s dietary diversity in rural Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, July 2015
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Title
Socio-economic determinants of household food security and women’s dietary diversity in rural Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s41043-015-0022-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen Harris-Fry, Kishwar Azad, Abdul Kuddus, Sanjit Shaha, Badrun Nahar, Munir Hossen, Leila Younes, Anthony Costello, Edward Fottrell

Abstract

There has been limited decline in undernutrition rates in South Asia compared with the rest of Asia and one reason for this may be low levels of household food security. However, the evidence base on the determinants of household food security is limited. To develop policies intended to improve household food security, improved knowledge of the determinants of household food security is required. Household data were collected in 2011 from a randomly selected sample of 2,809 women of reproductive age. The sample was drawn from nine unions in three districts of rural Bangladesh. Multinomial logistic regression was conducted to measure the relationship between selected determinants of household food security and months of adequate household food provisioning, and a linear regression to measure the association between the same determinants and women's dietary diversity score. The analyses found that land ownership, adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 0.28 (CI 0.18, 0.42); relative wealth (middle tertile 0.49 (0.29, 0.84) and top tertile 0.18 (0.10, 0.33)); women's literacy 0.64 (0.46, 0.90); access to media 0.49 (0.33, 0.72); and women's freedom to access the market 0.56 (0.36, 0.85) all significantly reduced the risk of food insecurity. Larger households increased the risk of food insecurity, adjusted RRR 1.46 (CI 1.02, 2.09). Households with vegetable gardens 0.20 (0.11, 0.31), rich households 0.46 (0.24, 0.68) and literate women 0.37 (0.20, 0.54) were significantly more likely to have better dietary diversity scores. Household food insecurity remains a key public health problem in Bangladesh, with households suffering food shortages for an average of one quarter of the year. Simple survey and analytical methods are able to identify numerous interlinked factors associated with household food security, but wealth and literacy were the only two determinants associated with both improved food security and dietary diversity. We cannot conclude whether improvements in all determinants are necessarily needed to improve household food security, but new and existing policies that relate to these determinants should be designed and monitored with the knowledge that they could substantially influence the food security and nutritional status of the population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 385 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 383 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 88 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 14%
Researcher 39 10%
Student > Bachelor 32 8%
Student > Postgraduate 23 6%
Other 63 16%
Unknown 87 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 51 13%
Social Sciences 38 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 31 8%
Other 43 11%
Unknown 104 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,076,061
of 7,066,845 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#161
of 211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#264,031
of 320,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#5
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,066,845 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 211 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.