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Reactive oxygen species contribute to dysfunction of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells in aged C57BL/6 J mice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, October 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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48 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Reactive oxygen species contribute to dysfunction of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells in aged C57BL/6 J mice
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12929-015-0201-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcella L. Porto, Bianca P. Rodrigues, Thiago N. Menezes, Sara L. Ceschim, Dulce E. Casarini, Agata L. Gava, Thiago Melo C. Pereira, Elisardo C. Vasquez, Bianca P. Campagnaro, Silvana S. Meyrelles

Abstract

Stem cells of intensely regenerative tissues are susceptible to cellular damage. Although the response to this process in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is crucial, the mechanisms by which hematopoietic homeostasis is sustained are not completely understood. Aging increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and inflammation, which contribute to increased proliferation, senescence and/or apoptosis, leading to self-renewal premature exhaustion. In this study, we assessed ROS production, DNA damage, apoptosis, senescence and plasticity in young, middle and aged (2-, 12- and 24-month-old, respectively) C57BL/6 J mice. Aged HSCs showed an increase in intracellular superoxide anion (1.4-fold), hydrogen peroxide (2-fold), nitric oxide (1.6-fold), peroxynitrite/hidroxil (2.6-fold) compared with young cells. We found that mitochondria and NADPHox were the major sources of ROS production in the three groups studied, whereas CYP450 contributed in middle and aged, and xanthine oxidase only in aged HSCs. In addition, we observed DNA damage and apoptosis in the middle (4.2- and 2-fold, respectively) and aged (6- and 4-fold, respectively) mice; aged mice also exhibited a significantly shorter telomere length (-1.8-fold) and a lower expression of plasticity markers. These data suggest that aging impairs the functionality of HSCs and that these age-associated alterations may affect the efficacy of aged HSC recovery and transplantation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 14 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2020.
All research outputs
#13,853,216
of 21,326,488 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#593
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#204,847
of 375,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,326,488 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,042 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.