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Sumoylation of Kif18A plays a role in regulating mitotic progression

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, March 2015
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Title
Sumoylation of Kif18A plays a role in regulating mitotic progression
Published in
BMC Cancer, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1226-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Feikun Yang, Yan Chen, Wei Dai

Abstract

Kif18A, the kinesin-8 motor protein, plays an essential role in regulating alignment of bi-oriented chromosomes at the midzone during mitosis. Kinesin proteins, including Kif18A, are often deregulated in many types of cancers and are thought to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, little is known about the post-translational modifications of Kif18A and their effects on its biological activity. Kif18A was identified to be a SUMO2 acceptor by using Ni-IDA resin to precipitate proteins from cells stably expressing His6-SUMO2. To identify the potential lysine residues, multi-site directed mutagenesis together with transient transfection and Ni-IDA pull-down assay were carried out. The confocal time-lapse imaging and immunofluorescent staining were used to study the roles of SUMO2 modification on Kif18A's activity during the cell cycle. Kif18A is covalently modified by SUMO2 during the cell cycle, and its sumoylation peaks at metaphase and then rapidly decreases upon anaphase onset. Mutational analysis identifies multiple lysine residues (K148, K442, K533, K660 and K683) as potential SUMO acceptors. The functional studies reveal that sumoylation of Kif18A has little effect on protein stability and subcellular localization. However, compared with the wild-type control, ectopic expression of SUMO-resistant mutants of Kif18A results in a significant delay of mitotic exit. Confocal microscopy shows that cells expressing SUMO-resistant Kif18A display a compromised dissociation of BubR1 from kinetochores after anaphase onset. Our studies reveal that sumoylation functions as an unidentified form of post-translational modification that regulates Kif18A activity during mitotic progression.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 46%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Master 2 8%
Professor 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 33%
Unspecified 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,092,722
of 7,084,078 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,564
of 3,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#264,305
of 320,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#133
of 196 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 196 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.