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Cancer survival in New South Wales, Australia: socioeconomic disparities remain despite overall improvements

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Cancer survival in New South Wales, Australia: socioeconomic disparities remain despite overall improvements
Published in
BMC Cancer, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2065-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julia F. Stanbury, Peter D. Baade, Yan Yu, Xue Qin Yu

Abstract

Disparities in cancer survival by socioeconomic status have been reported previously in Australia. We investigated whether those disparities have changed over time. We used population-based cancer registry data for 377,493 patients diagnosed with one of 10 major cancers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Patients were assigned to an area-based measure of socioeconomic status. Five-year relative survival was estimated for each socioeconomic quintile in each 'at risk' period (1996-2000 and 2004-2008) for the 10 individual cancers. Poisson-regression modelling was used to adjust for several prognostic factors. The relative excess risk of death by socioeconomic quintile derived from this modelling was compared over time. Although survival increased over time for most individual cancers, Poisson-regression models indicated that socioeconomic disparities continued to exist in the recent period. Significant socioeconomic disparities were observed for stomach, colorectal, liver, lung, breast and prostate cancer in 1996-2000 and remained so for 2004-2008, while significant disparities emerged for cervical and uterus cancer in 2004-2008 (although the interaction between period and socioeconomic status was not significant). About 13.4 % of deaths attributable to a diagnosis of cancer could have been postponed if this socioeconomic disparity was eliminated. While recent health and social policies in NSW have accompanied an increase in cancer survival overall, they have not been associated with a reduction in socioeconomic inequalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Researcher 4 10%
Professor 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 9 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Engineering 2 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2016.
All research outputs
#421,733
of 7,346,659 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#63
of 3,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,494
of 322,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#5
of 193 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,346,659 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,231 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 193 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.