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Cognitive impairment and dependence of patients with diabetes older than 65 years old in an urban area (DERIVA study)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Cognitive impairment and dependence of patients with diabetes older than 65 years old in an urban area (DERIVA study)
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12877-016-0208-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emiliano Rodríguez-Sánchez, Sara Mora-Simón, María C. Patino-Alonso, Diana Pérez-Arechaederra, José I. Recio-Rodríguez, Manuel A. Gómez-Marcos, Luis F. Valero-Juan, Luis García-Ortiz

Abstract

We analyzed the associations between diabetes and cognitive impairment (CI) and dependence in a population of patients 65 years or older. Cross-sectional study. We randomly selected 311 participants over the age of 65 living in an urban area of Spain. The mean age of the cohort was 75.89 ± 7.12 years, and 69 of the individuals (22.2 %) had diabetes. Two questionnaires were used to assess cognitive performance (MMSE and Seven Minute Screen Test), and two assessments were used to evaluate patient dependence (Barthel Index and Lawton-Brody Index). Clinical information and sociodemographic data were also gathered. Nearly one quarter of patients with diabetes (21.7 %) lived alone. Diabetic patients were more sedentary (p = .033) than non-diabetic patients. Roughly one sixth (15.3 %) of the diabetics and 10.1 % of the non-diabetics were depressed (p = .332). CI was present in 26.1 % of the diabetics and 14.5 % of non-diabetics (p = .029). Diabetic patients had a MMSE score that was significantly worse than non-diabetics (24.88 ± 4.74 vs 26.05 ± 4.03; p <.05), but no differences were found in the Seven Minute Screen Test. Logistic regressions revealed that the presence of diabetes was independently associated with CI (adjusted for age, gender, years of education, sedentary lifestyle, body mass index, diastolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and depression (OR = 2.940, p = .013). Patients with diabetes showed greater dependence, as measured by the Barthel Index (p = .03) and Lawton-Brody Index (p <.01). Nevertheless, when dependence (dependence or not dependence for each questionnaire) used as a dependent variable in the logistic regression analyses, no significant association with diabetes was found, after adjusting for confounding variables. Diabetic patients over the age of 65 are more likely to present CI but not dependence. These findings support the need to include both a functional and cognitive assessment as necessary components in a standard evaluation in both clinical guides and randomized trials of therapeutic interventions in patients with diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
India 1 1%
Unknown 70 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 21%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 28%
Psychology 12 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 19 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2016.
All research outputs
#714,830
of 7,108,255 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#110
of 741 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,079
of 319,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#11
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,108,255 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 741 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.