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Enhancing reciprocal partner support to prevent perinatal depression and anxiety: a Delphi consensus study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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24 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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166 Mendeley
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Title
Enhancing reciprocal partner support to prevent perinatal depression and anxiety: a Delphi consensus study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0721-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pamela Pilkington, Lisa Milne, Kathryn Cairns, Thomas Whelan

Abstract

Systematic reviews have established that partner support protects against perinatal mood problems. It is therefore a key target for interventions designed to prevent maternal and paternal depression and anxiety. Nonetheless, the extant literature is yet to be translated into specific actions that parents can implement. Prevention efforts aiming to facilitate reciprocal partner support within the couple dyad need to provide specific guidance on how partners can support one another to reduce their vulnerability to perinatal depression and anxiety. Two panels of experts in perinatal mental health (21 consumer advocates and 39 professionals) participated in a Delphi consensus study to establish how partners can support one another to reduce their risk of developing depression and anxiety during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A total of 214 recommendations on how partners can support each other were endorsed by at least 80 % of both panels as important or essential in reducing the risk of perinatal depression and anxiety. The recommendations were grouped under the following categories: becoming a parent, supporting each other through pregnancy and childbirth, communication, conflict, division of labor, practical support, emotional support, emotional closeness, sexual satisfaction, using alcohol and drugs, encouraging self-care, developing acceptance, and help-seeking. This study established consensus between consumers and professionals in order to produce a set of guidelines on how partners can support each other to prevent depression and anxiety during pregnancy and following childbirth. It is hoped that these guidelines will inform the development of perinatal depression and anxiety prevention efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 166 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 164 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 17%
Student > Master 25 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 10%
Researcher 14 8%
Student > Bachelor 14 8%
Other 35 21%
Unknown 33 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 58 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 11%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Neuroscience 5 3%
Other 11 7%
Unknown 40 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2020.
All research outputs
#1,306,354
of 17,154,907 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#452
of 3,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,549
of 348,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,154,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,531 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them