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Mass casualty incidents - time to engage

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Emergency Surgery, February 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Mass casualty incidents - time to engage
Published in
World Journal of Emergency Surgery, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13017-016-0064-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Offir Ben-Ishay, Offir Ben-Ishay, Michele Mitaritonno, Fausto Catena, Massimo Sartelli, Luca Ansaloni, Yoram Kluger

Abstract

Mass casualty incident continues to overwhelm medical systems worldwide. Preparedness for an MCI is a crucial requisite for the injured better outcome. The World Society of Emergency Surgery initiated a survey in regard to its senior member's personal and institutional preparedness for MCI. The results here in presented indicate that WSES should engage in a formatted and structured preparedness course for medical institutions and individuals."By all appearances it seems to be just another normal Saturday morning in the emergency department (ED). Patients occupy thirty out of the sixty beds; some awaits discharge, some awaits admission to the hospital. All of a sudden the squeaky voice of the red phone is tearing the air, the hard metal voice on the line is reporting of an explosion in the nearby train station, estimated number of casualties is 80. You ask for their estimated time of arrival, when you hear the first sirens of ambulances parking out of the ED; no answer was needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 86 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 7 8%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 22 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Engineering 6 7%
Psychology 2 2%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 26 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,111,115
of 7,103,144 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#178
of 226 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#264,039
of 319,350 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#10
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,103,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 226 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,350 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.