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Involved-field radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: theory and practice

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Involved-field radiotherapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: theory and practice
Published in
Radiation Oncology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13014-016-0589-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Minghuan Li, Xiaoli Zhang, Fen Zhao, Yijun Luo, Li Kong, Jinming Yu

Abstract

Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is characterized by a high rate of lymph node metastasis and its spread pattern is not always predictable. Chemoradiotherapy has an important role in the treatment of EC in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. However, regarding the target volume for radiation, different clinical practices exist. Theoretically, in addition to the clinical target volume administered to the gross lesion, it might seem logical to deliver a certain dose to the uninvolved regional lymph node area at risk for microscopic disease. However, in practice, it is difficult because of the intolerance of normal tissue to radiotherapy (RT), particularly if all regions containing the cervical, mediastinal, and upper abdominal nodes are covered. To date, the use of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) is still controversial in the field of radiotherapy. Some investigators use involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) in order to reduce treatment-related toxicities. It is thought that micrometastases can be controlled, to some extent, by chemotherapy and the abscopal effects of radiation. It is the presence of overtly involved lymph nodes rather than the micrometastatic nodes negatively affects survival in patients with EC. In another hand, lymph nodes stationed near primary tumors also receive considerable incidental irradiation doses that may contribute to the elimination of subclinical lesions. These data indicate that an irradiation volume covering only the gross tumor is appropriate. When using ENI or IFRT, very few patients experience solitary regional node failure and out-of-field lymph node failure is not common. Primary tumor recurrence and distant metastases, rather than regional lymph node failure, affect the overall survival in patients with EC. The available evidence indicates that the use of ENI seems to prevent or delay regional nodal relapse rather than improve survival. In a word, these data suggest that IFRT is feasible in EC patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 51%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,788,242
of 7,220,962 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#220
of 1,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,832
of 320,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#9
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,220,962 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,030 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.