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Is adjustment for reporting heterogeneity necessary in sleep disorders? results from the Japanese World Health Survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, February 2016
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Title
Is adjustment for reporting heterogeneity necessary in sleep disorders? results from the Japanese World Health Survey
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0733-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Md. Ismail Tareque, Nayu Ikeda, Atsushi Koshio, Toshihiko Hasegawa

Abstract

Anchoring vignettes are brief texts describing a hypothetical character who illustrates a certain fixed level of a trait under evaluation. This research uses vignettes to elucidate factors associated with sleep disorders in adult Japanese before and after adjustment for reporting heterogeneity in self-reports. This study also evaluates the need for adjusting for reporting heterogeneity in the management of sleep and energy related problems in Japan. We investigated a dataset of 1002 respondents aged 18 years and over from the Japanese World Health Survey, which collected information through face-to-face interview from 2002 to 2003. The ordered probit model and the Compound Hierarchical Ordered Probit (CHOPIT) model, which incorporated anchoring vignettes, were employed to estimate and compare associations of sleep and energy with socio-demographic and life-style factors before and after adjustment for differences in response category cut-points for each individual. The prevalence of self-reported problems with sleep and energy was 53 %. Without correction of cut-point shifts, age, sex, and the number of comorbidities were significantly associated with a greater severity of sleep-related problems. After correction, age, the number of comorbidities, and regular exercise were significantly associated with a greater severity of sleep-related problems; sex was no longer a significant factor. Compared to the ordered probit model, the CHOPIT model provided two changes with a subtle difference in the magnitude of regression coefficients after correction for reporting heterogeneity. Sleep disorders are common in the general adult population of Japan. Correction for reporting heterogeneity using anchoring vignettes is not a necessary tool for proper management of sleep and energy related problems among Japanese adults. Older age, gender differences in communicating sleep-related problems, the presence of multiple morbidities, and regular exercise should be the focus of policies and clinical practice to improve sleep and energy management in Japan.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 22%
Psychology 11 22%
Social Sciences 7 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2016.
All research outputs
#11,038,540
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,503
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#212,662
of 340,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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