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Gaining insight into how women conceptualize satisfaction: Western Australian women’s perception of their maternity care experiences

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
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Title
Gaining insight into how women conceptualize satisfaction: Western Australian women’s perception of their maternity care experiences
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0759-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy Lewis, Yvonne L. Hauck, Fiona Ronchi, Caroline Crichton, Liana Waller

Abstract

The concept of maternal satisfaction is challenging, as women's and clinicians' expectations and experiences can differ. Our aim was to investigate women's experiences of maternity care in an urban tertiary obstetric setting, to gain insight into conceptualization of satisfaction across the childbirth continuum. This mixed method study was conducted at a public maternity hospital in Western Australia. A questionnaire was sent to 733 women two weeks post birth, which included an invitation for an audio-recorded, telephone interview. Frequency distributions and univariate comparisons were employed for quantitative data. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts was undertaken to extract common themes. A total of 54 % (399 of 733) returned the questionnaire. Quantitative results indicated that women were less likely to feel: involved if they did not have a spontaneous vaginal birth (P = 0.020); supported by a midwife if they had a caesarean (P = <0.001); or supported by an obstetrician if they had a spontaneous vaginal birth (P = <0.001). Qualitative findings emerged from 63 interviews which highlighted the influence that organization of care, resources and facilities had on women's satisfaction. These paradigms unfolded as three broad themes constructed by four sub-themes, each illustrating a dichotomy of experiences. The first theme 'how care was provided' encompassed: familiar faces versus a different one every time and the best place to be as opposed to so disappointed. The second theme 'attributes of staff' included: above and beyond versus caring without caring and in good hands as opposed to handled incorrectly. The third theme 'engaged in care' incorporated: explained everything versus did not know why and had a choice as opposed to did not listen to my needs. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the majority of women surveyed were satisfied. Mode of birth influenced women's perception of being involved with their birth. Being able to explore the diversity of women's experiences in relation to satisfaction with their maternity care in an urban, tertiary obstetric setting has offered greater insight into what women value: a sensitive, respectful, shared relationship with competent clinicians who recognise and strive to provide woman focused care across the childbirth continuum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 94 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 19%
Student > Master 15 16%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Other 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 37 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 20%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,510,964
of 7,371,787 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,038
of 1,517 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,507
of 321,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#46
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,371,787 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,517 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.