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Community occupational therapy for people with dementia and family carers (COTiD-UK) versus treatment as usual (Valuing Active Life in Dementia [VALID] programme): study protocol for a randomised…

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, February 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
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Title
Community occupational therapy for people with dementia and family carers (COTiD-UK) versus treatment as usual (Valuing Active Life in Dementia [VALID] programme): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13063-015-1150-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Wenborn, Sinéad Hynes, Esme Moniz-Cook, Gail Mountain, Fiona Poland, Michael King, Rumana Omar, Steven Morris, Myrra Vernooij-Dassen, David Challis, Susan Michie, Ian Russell, Catherine Sackley, Maud Graff, Aidan O’Keeffe, Nadia Crellin, Martin Orrell

Abstract

A community-based occupational therapy intervention for people with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers (Community Occupational Therapy in Dementia (COTiD)) was found clinically and cost effective in the Netherlands but not in Germany. This highlights the need to adapt and implement complex interventions to specific national contexts. The current trial aims to evaluate the United Kingdom-adapted occupational therapy intervention for people with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers living in the community (COTiD-UK) compared with treatment as usual. This study is a multi-centre, parallel-group, pragmatic randomised trial with internal pilot. We aim to allocate 480 pairs, with each pair comprising a person with mild to moderate dementia and a family carer, who provides at least 4 hours of practical support per week, at random between COTiD-UK and treatment as usual. We shall assess participants at baseline, 12 and 26 weeks, and by telephone at 52 and 78 weeks (first 40 % of recruits only) after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is the Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) at 26 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include quality of life, mood, and resource use. To assess intervention delivery, and client experience, we shall collect qualitative data via audio recordings of COTiD-UK sessions and conduct semi-structured interviews with pairs and occupational therapists. COTiD-UK is an evidence-based person-centred intervention that reflects the current priority to enable people with dementia to remain in their own homes by improving their capabilities whilst reducing carer burden. If COTiD-UK is clinically and cost effective, this has major implications for the future delivery of dementia services across the UK. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN10748953 Date of registration: 18 September 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 185 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 20%
Researcher 34 18%
Student > Master 30 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 29 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 52 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 40 21%
Psychology 24 13%
Social Sciences 19 10%
Engineering 3 2%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 38 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2020.
All research outputs
#1,646,114
of 16,414,462 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#610
of 4,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,608
of 347,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,414,462 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,369 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,855 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them