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Structure, function and cell dynamics during chaetogenesis of abdominal uncini in Sabellaria alveolata (Sabellariidae, Annelida)

Overview of attention for article published in Zoological Letters, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Structure, function and cell dynamics during chaetogenesis of abdominal uncini in Sabellaria alveolata (Sabellariidae, Annelida)
Published in
Zoological Letters, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40851-016-0037-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ekin Tilic, Thomas Bartolomaeus

Abstract

Dynamic apical microvilli of a single cell, called the chaetoblast, inside an ectodermal invagination form the template of annelid chaetae. Changes in the pattern of microvilli are frozen in time by release of chitin, such that the structure of the definitive chaeta reflects its formation. Cellular interactions during chaetogenesis also influence the structure of the chaeta. Analysing chaetogenesis allows for testing hypotheses on the homology of certain chaetal types. We used this approach to test whether the unusual uncini in Sabellaria alveolata are homologous to apparently similar uncini in other annelid taxa. Our study reveals unexpected details of sabellariid uncini, which mechanically reinforce the neuropodia enabling their use as paddles. The final structure of the chaeta is caused by pulses of microvilli formation and dynamic interaction between the chaetoblast and adjoining follicle cells. Cell dynamics during chaetogenesis of the uncini in Sabellaria alveolata exceeds by far that reported in previous studies on the formation of this type of chaetae. Despite the superficial similarity of uncini in sabellariids and other annelids, differences in structure and details of formation do not support the homology of this type of chaetae. Chaetogenesis of sabellariid uncini involves unexpected microvilli and cell dynamics, and provides evidence that interactions between cells play a larger role in chaetogenesis than previously expected. In addition to their function as anchors, uncini in Sabellaridae stabilize the paddle-shaped notopodia, as each uncinus possesses a long, thin rod that extends deeply into the notopodium. The rods of all uncini in a single row form a bundle inside the notopodium that additionally serves as a muscle attachment site and thus have a similar function to the inner chaeta (acicula) of errant polychaetes (Aciculata).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 8%
Unknown 24 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 42%
Environmental Science 5 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,713,363
of 7,750,811 outputs
Outputs from Zoological Letters
#24
of 53 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,493
of 329,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zoological Letters
#6
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,750,811 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 53 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.