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Changes in lipid composition during sexual development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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Citations

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122 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in lipid composition during sexual development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1130-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Phuong N. Tran, Simon H. J. Brown, Melanie Rug, Melanie C. Ridgway, Todd W. Mitchell, Alexander G. Maier

Abstract

The development of differentiated sexual stages (gametocytes) within human red blood cells is essential for the propagation of the malaria parasite, since only mature gametocytes will survive in the mosquito's midgut. Hence gametocytogenesis is a pre-requisite for transmission of the disease. Physiological changes involved in sexual differentiation are still enigmatic. In particular the lipid metabolism-despite being central to cellular regulation and development-is not well explored. Here the lipid profiles of red blood cells infected with the five different sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum were analysed by mass spectrometry and compared to those from uninfected and asexual trophozoite infected erythrocytes. Fundamental differences between erythrocytes infected with the different parasite stages were revealed. In mature gametocytes many lipids that decrease in the trophozoite and early gametocyte infected red blood cells are regained. In particular, regulators of membrane fluidity, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, increased significantly during gametocyte maturation. Neutral lipids (serving mainly as caloriometric reserves) increased from 3 % of total lipids in uninfected to 27 % in stage V gametocyte infected red blood cells. The major membrane lipid class (phospholipids) decreased during gametocyte development. The lipid profiles of infected erythrocytes are characteristic for the particular parasite life cycle and maturity stages of gametocytes. The obtained lipid profiles are crucial in revealing the lipid metabolism of malaria parasites and identifying targets to interfere with this deadly disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 121 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 28%
Researcher 22 18%
Student > Master 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 4%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 24 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2017.
All research outputs
#8,789,942
of 11,419,765 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,739
of 3,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,356
of 343,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#150
of 191 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,419,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,368 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 191 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.