↓ Skip to main content

Role of oral Minocycline in acute encephalitis syndrome in India – a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Role of oral Minocycline in acute encephalitis syndrome in India – a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1385-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rashmi Kumar, Anirban Basu, Subrata Sinha, Manoj Das, Piyush Tripathi, Amita Jain, Chandrakanta Kumar, Virendra Atam, Saima Khan, Amit Shanker Singh

Abstract

Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a public health problem in India. Neuroinfections are believed to be the most important etiology. Minocycline is a semisythetic tetracycline having excellent penetration into cerebrospinal fluid, established neuroprotective and antiviral properties besides action on nonviral causes of AES. It has been shown to be effective in animal model of Japanese encephalitis (JE). A randomized, controlled trial of nasogastric/oral minocycline in JE and AES at a single centre in Uttar Pradesh, northern India, was therefore conducted. Patients beyond 3 years of age - but excluding women aged 16-44 years - hospitalized with AES of < =7 days duration were enrolled and block randomized to receive nasogastric/oral minocycline or placebo suspension and followed up. Patients, study personnel and those entering data were blinded as to drug or placebo received. Primary outcome was cumulative mortality at 3 months from hospitalization. Analysis was by intention to treat. 281 patients were enrolled, 140 received drug and 141 placebo. While there was no overall statistically significant difference in 3 month mortality between drug and placebo groups [RR = 0 · 83 (0 · 6-1 · 1)], there were encouraging trends in patients older than 12 years [RR = 0.70 (0.41-1.18)] and in Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) at 3 months (χ(2) = 7 · 44, p = 0 · 059). These trends were further accentuated if patients dying within one day of reaching hospital were excluded [OR for 3 month mortality =0 · 70 (0 · 46-1 · 07), p = 0.090; 3 month GOS p = 0 · 028]. A trend towards better outcomes was observed with minocycline, especially in those patients who survived the initial day in hospital. These findings should form the basis for planning a larger study and possibly including minocycline in the initial management of AES as seen here. The trial was registered with Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI) - CTRI/2010/091/006143.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Master 9 18%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#8,928,636
of 16,291,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,305
of 5,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,822
of 347,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,291,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,916 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them