↓ Skip to main content

Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part I – The relationship between low self-esteem and psychiatric diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Hospital Psychiatry, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
120 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part I – The relationship between low self-esteem and psychiatric diagnosis
Published in
Annals of General Hospital Psychiatry, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/1475-2832-2-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter H Silverstone, Mahnaz Salsali

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and the degree of lowered self-esteem across the spectrum of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: The present study was carried out on a consecutive sample of 1,190 individuals attending an open-access psychiatric outpatient clinic. There were 957 psychiatric patients, 182 cases with conditions not attributable to a mental disorder, and 51 control subjects. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM III-R diagnostic criteria following detailed assessments. At screening, individuals completed two questionnaires to measure self-esteem, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale and the Janis and Field Social Adequacy scale. Statistical analyses were performed on the scores of the two self-esteem scales. RESULTS: The results of the present study demonstrate that all psychiatric patients suffer some degree of lowered self-esteem. Furthermore, the degree to which self-esteem was lowered differed among various diagnostic groups. Self-esteem was lowest in patients with major depressive disorder, eating disorders, and substance abuse. Also, there is evidence of cumulative effects of psychiatric disorders on self-esteem. Patients who had comorbid diagnoses, particularly when one of the diagnoses was depressive disorders, tended to show lower self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS: Based on both the previous literature, and the results from the current study, we propose that there is a vicious cycle between low self-esteem and onset of psychiatric disorders. Thus, low self-esteem increases the susceptibility for development of psychiatric disorders, and the presence of a psychiatric disorder, in turn, lowers self-esteem. Our findings suggest that this effect is more pronounced with certain psychiatric disorders, such as major depression and eating disorders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 203 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 20%
Student > Bachelor 32 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 9%
Researcher 13 6%
Other 32 15%
Unknown 49 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 86 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 6%
Social Sciences 11 5%
Neuroscience 6 3%
Other 12 6%
Unknown 53 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,067,902
of 7,059,888 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Hospital Psychiatry
#4
of 5 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#263,985
of 320,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Hospital Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,059,888 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one scored the same or higher as 1 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,072 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them