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A hybrid simulator model for the control of catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage in the military environment

Overview of attention for article published in Advances in Simulation, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
A hybrid simulator model for the control of catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage in the military environment
Published in
Advances in Simulation, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s41077-016-0008-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katarina Silverplats, Anders Jonsson, Lars Lundberg

Abstract

Catastrophic haemorrhage from extremity injuries has for a long time been the single most common cause of preventable death in the military environment. The effective use of extremity tourniquets has increased the survival of combat casualties, and exsanguination from isolated limb injuries is no longer the most common cause of death. Today, the most common cause of potentially preventable death is haemorrhage from the junctional zones, i.e. the most proximal part of the extremities, not amenable to standard tourniquets. Different training techniques to control catastrophic haemorrhage have been used by the Swedish Armed Forces in the pre-deployment training of physicians, nurses and medics for many years. The training techniques include different types of human patient simulators such as moulage patients and manikins. Preferred training conditions for the control of catastrophic haemorrhage include a high degree of realism, in combination with multiple training attempts. This report presents a new hybrid training model for catastrophic external junctional haemorrhage control. It offers a readily reproducible, simple and inexpensive opportunity to train personnel to deal with life threatening catastrophic junctional haemorrhage. In particular, this model offers an opportunity for non-medical military personnel in Sweden to practice control of realistic catastrophic haemorrhage, with multiple training attempts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 6 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 6 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,122,005
of 21,042,052 outputs
Outputs from Advances in Simulation
#133
of 201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,477
of 374,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in Simulation
#23
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,042,052 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 201 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,288 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.