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Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, January 2012
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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138 Dimensions

Readers on

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190 Mendeley
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Title
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-7-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan A Tovar

Abstract

Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 182 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Other 27 14%
Student > Master 25 13%
Student > Postgraduate 23 12%
Researcher 22 12%
Other 42 22%
Unknown 21 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 121 64%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 6%
Engineering 10 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 27 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2014.
All research outputs
#11,827,892
of 21,331,034 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1,094
of 2,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,734
of 251,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#44
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,331,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,382 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.