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Localization of deformed wing virus (DWV) in the brains of the honeybee, Apis mellifera Linnaeus

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Localization of deformed wing virus (DWV) in the brains of the honeybee, Apis mellifera Linnaeus
Published in
Virology Journal, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1743-422x-6-182
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karan S Shah, Elizabeth C Evans, Marie C Pizzorno

Abstract

Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that infects European honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) and has been isolated from the brains of aggressive bees in Japan. DWV is known to be transmitted both vertically and horizontally between bees in a colony and can lead to both symptomatic and asymptomatic infections in bees. In environmentally stressful conditions, DWV can contribute to the demise of a honeybee colony. The purpose of the current study is to identify regions within the brains of honeybees where DWV replicates using in-situ hybridization. In-situ hybridizations were conducted with both sense and antisense probes on the brains of honeybees that were positive for DWV as measured by real-time RT-PCR. The visual neuropils demonstrated detectable levels of the DWV positive-strand genome. The mushroom bodies and antenna lobe neuropils also showed the presence of the viral genome. Weaker staining with the sense probe in the same regions demonstrates that the antigenome is also present and that the virus is actively replicating in these regions of the brain. These results demonstrate that in bees infected with DWV the virus is replicating in critical regions of the brain, including the neuropils responsible for vision and olfaction. Therefore DWV infection of the brain could adversely affect critical sensory functions and alter normal bee behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 71 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 23%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Professor 6 8%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 63%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,613,729
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#116
of 2,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,967
of 226,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#6
of 269 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,566 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,263 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 269 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.