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Maternal urinary manganese and risk of low birth weight: a case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2016
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Title
Maternal urinary manganese and risk of low birth weight: a case–control study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2816-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Xia, Yanqiu Zhou, Tongzhang Zheng, Bin Zhang, Bryan A. Bassig, Yuanyuan Li, John Pierce Wise, Aifen Zhou, Yanjian Wan, Youjie Wang, Chao Xiong, Jinzhu Zhao, Zhengkuan Li, Yuanxiang Yao, Jie Hu, Xinyun Pan, Shunqing Xu

Abstract

Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, but exposure to high levels has been associated with adverse developmental outcomes. Early epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of Mn on fetal growth are inconsistent. We investigated the association between maternal urinary Mn during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight (LBW). Mn concentrations in maternal urine samples collected before delivery were measured in 816 subjects (204 LBW cases and 612 matched controls) recruited between 2012 and 2014 in Hubei Province, China. The median Mn concentration in maternal urine was 0.69 μg/g creatinine. Compared to the medium tertile of Mn levels, an increased risk of LBW was observed for the lowest tertile (≤0.30 μg/g creatinine) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.28; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.67, 2.45], and a significantly increased risk of LBW was observed for the highest tertile (≥1.16 μg/g creatinine) [adjusted OR = 2.04; 95 % CI = 1.12, 3.72]. A curvilinear relationship between maternal urinary Mn and risk of LBW was observed, showing that the concentration at 0.43 μg/g creatinine was the point of inflection. Similar associations were observed among the mothers with female infants and among the younger mothers < 28 years old. However, among the mothers with male infants or the older mothers ≥ 28 years old, only higher levels of Mn were positively associated with LBW. Lower or higher levels of maternal urinary Mn are associated with LBW, though only the association of LBW risk and higher levels of Mn was statistically significant. The findings also show that the associations may vary by maternal age and infant sex, but require confirmation in other populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Rwanda 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 22%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,203,652
of 7,196,678 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,048
of 6,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#268,851
of 322,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#209
of 223 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,196,678 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 223 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.