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High-fat diet impairs spatial memory and hippocampal intrinsic excitability and sex-dependently alters circulating insulin and hippocampal insulin sensitivity

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 123)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
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Title
High-fat diet impairs spatial memory and hippocampal intrinsic excitability and sex-dependently alters circulating insulin and hippocampal insulin sensitivity
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0060-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica L. Underwood, Lucien T. Thompson

Abstract

High-fat diets promoting obesity/type-2 diabetes can impair physiology and cognitive performance, although sex-dependent comparisons of these impairments are rarely made. Transient reductions in Ca(2+)-dependent afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) occur during memory consolidation, enhancing intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In rats fed standard diets, insulin can enhance memory and reduce amplitude and duration of AHPs. Effects of chronic high-fat diet (HFD) on memory, circulating insulin, and neuronal physiology were compared between young adult male and female Long-Evans rats. Rats fed for 12 weeks (from weaning) a HFD or a control diet (CD) were then tested in vivo prior to in vitro recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons. The HFD significantly impaired spatial memory in both males and females. Significant sex differences occurred in circulating insulin and in the insulin sensitivity of hippocampal neurons. Circulating insulin significantly increased in HFD males but decreased in HFD females. While the HFD significantly reduced hippocampal intrinsic excitability in both sexes, CA1 neurons from HFD females remained insulin-sensitive but those from HFD males became insulin-insensitive. Findings consistent with these have been characterized previously in HFD or senescent males, but the effects observed here in young females are unique. Loss of CA1 neuronal excitability, and sex-dependent loss of insulin sensitivity, can have significant cognitive consequences, over both the short term and the life span. These findings highlight needs for more research into sex-dependent differences, relating systemic and neural plasticity mechanisms in metabolic disorders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 28%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Master 10 14%
Researcher 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 11 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 21 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 16%
Psychology 9 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 16 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2016.
All research outputs
#883,326
of 7,252,957 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#31
of 123 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,327
of 284,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,252,957 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 123 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.