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LIN7A is a major determinant of cell-polarity defects in breast carcinomas

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
LIN7A is a major determinant of cell-polarity defects in breast carcinomas
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0680-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadège Gruel, Laetitia Fuhrmann, Catalina Lodillinsky, Vanessa Benhamo, Odette Mariani, Aurélie Cédenot, Laurent Arnould, Gaëtan Macgrogan, Xavier Sastre-Garau, Philippe Chavrier, Olivier Delattre, Anne Vincent-Salomon, Gruel, Nadège, Fuhrmann, Laetitia, Lodillinsky, Catalina, Benhamo, Vanessa, Mariani, Odette, Cédenot, Aurélie, Arnould, Laurent, Macgrogan, Gaëtan, Sastre-Garau, Xavier, Chavrier, Philippe, Delattre, Olivier, Vincent-Salomon, Anne

Abstract

Polarity defects are a hallmark of most carcinomas. Cells from invasive micropapillary carcinomas (IMPCs) of the breast are characterized by a striking cell polarity inversion and represent an interesting model for the analysis of polarity abnormalities. In-depth investigation of polarity proteins in 24 IMPCs and a gene expression profiling, comparing IMPC (n = 73) with invasive carcinomas of no special type (ICNST) (n = 51) have been performed. IMPCs showed a profound disorganization of the investigated polarity proteins and revealed major abnormalities in their subcellular localization. Gene expression profiling experiments highlighted a number of deregulated genes in the IMPCs that have a role in apico-basal polarity, adhesion and migration. LIN7A, a Crumbs-complex polarity gene, was one of the most differentially over-expressed genes in the IMPCs. Upon LIN7A over-expression, we observed hyperproliferation, invasion and a complete absence of lumen formation, revealing strong polarity defects. This study therefore shows that LIN7A has a crucial role in the polarity abnormalities associated with breast carcinogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 31%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 15%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2016.
All research outputs
#7,416,645
of 12,857,718 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#936
of 1,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,269
of 266,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#33
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,857,718 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,453 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,236 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.