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JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion in endometrial stromal sarcomas

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2016
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion in endometrial stromal sarcomas
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13023-016-0400-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andelko Hrzenjak

Abstract

Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESSs) belong to the rarest uterine malignancies (prevalence category <1-9/1,000,000). According to the new 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, they are separated into four categories; benign endometrial stromal nodules (ESNs), low grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (LG-ESSs), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (HG-ESSs) and undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs). Due to heterogeneous histopathologic appearance these tumors still represent diagnostic challenge, even for experienced pathologists. ESSs are genetically very heterogeneous and several chromosomal translocations and gene fusions have so far been identified in these malignancies. To date the JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion is by far the most frequent and seems to be the cytogenetic hallmark of ESN and LG-ESS. Based on present literature data this gene fusion is present in approximately 75 % of ESN, 50 % of LG-ESS and 15 % of HG-ESS cases. The frequency of JAZF1/SUZ12 appearance varies between classic ESS and different morphologic variants. This gene fusion is suggested to become a specific diagnostic tool, especially in difficult borderline cases. In combination with the recently described YWHAE/FAM22 gene fusion the JAZF1/SUZ12 fusion could be used to differentiate between LG-ESS and HG-ESS. The purpose of this review is to summarize literature data published in last two and a half decades about this gene fusion, as a contribution to our understanding of ESS genetics and pathogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 19%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Postgraduate 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 21%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,635,836
of 12,516,641 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#532
of 1,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,391
of 268,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#20
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,516,641 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,368 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.