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Enhancement of D-lactic acid production from a mixed glucose and xylose substrate by the Escherichia coli strain JH15 devoid of the glucose effect

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biotechnology, February 2016
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Title
Enhancement of D-lactic acid production from a mixed glucose and xylose substrate by the Escherichia coli strain JH15 devoid of the glucose effect
Published in
BMC Biotechnology, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12896-016-0248-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hongying Lu, Xiao Zhao, Yongze Wang, Xiaoren Ding, Jinhua Wang, Erin Garza, Ryan Manow, Andrew Iverson, Shengde Zhou

Abstract

A thermal tolerant stereo-complex poly-lactic acid (SC-PLA) can be made by mixing Poly-D-lactic acid (PDLA) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) at a defined ratio. This environmentally friendly biodegradable polymer could replace traditional recalcitrant petroleum-based plastics. To achieve this goal, however, it is imperative to produce optically pure lactic acid isomers using a cost-effective substrate such as cellulosic biomass. The roadblock of this process is that: 1) xylose derived from cellulosic biomass is un-fermentable by most lactic acid bacteria; 2) the glucose effect results in delayed and incomplete xylose fermentation. An alternative strain devoid of the glucose effect is needed to co-utilize both glucose and xylose for improved D-lactic acid production using a cellulosic biomass substrate. A previously engineered L-lactic acid Escherichia coli strain, WL204 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA ΔpflB ΔpdhR ::pflBp6-acEF-lpd ΔmgsA ΔadhE, ΔldhA::ldhL), was reengineered for production of D-lactic acid, by replacing the recombinant L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL) with a D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA). The glucose effect (catabolite repression) of the resulting strain, JH13, was eliminated by deletion of the ptsG gene which encodes for IIBC(glc) (a PTS enzyme for glucose transport). The derived strain, JH14, was metabolically evolved through serial transfers in screw-cap tubes containing glucose. The evolved strain, JH15, regained improved anaerobic cell growth using glucose. In fermentations using a mixture of glucose (50 g L(-1)) and xylose (50 g L(-1)), JH15 co-utilized both glucose and xylose, achieving an average sugar consumption rate of 1.04 g L(-1)h(-1), a D-lactic acid titer of 83 g L(-1), and a productivity of 0.86 g L(-1) h(-1). This result represents a 46 % improved sugar consumption rate, a 26 % increased D-lactic acid titer, and a 48 % enhanced productivity, compared to that achieved by JH13. These results demonstrated that JH15 has the potential for fermentative production of D-lactic acid using cellulosic biomass derived substrates, which contain a mixture of C6 and C5 sugars.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 18%
Engineering 6 14%
Unspecified 1 2%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 11 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2016.
All research outputs
#5,430,463
of 7,214,390 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biotechnology
#349
of 458 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,444
of 283,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biotechnology
#16
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,214,390 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 458 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,779 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.